Sweet and unsweetened coffee consumption linked to lower risk of death – Neuroscience News


Summary: Those who drink sugary coffee daily are up to 31% less likely to die in a 7-year follow-up than non-coffee drinkers. Those who drank unsweetened coffee were 21% less likely to die during follow-up.

Source: American College of Physicians

A cohort study found that, compared to non-coffee drinkers, adults who drank moderate amounts (1.5 to 3.5 cups per day) of unsweetened coffee or coffee sweetened with sugar were less likely to die during a 7-year follow-up period.

Results for those who used artificial sweeteners were less clear.

The findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.

Previous studies looking at the health effects of coffee have shown that coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of death, but have not distinguished between unsweetened coffee and coffee consumed with sugar or artificial sweeteners.

Researchers at Southern Medical University in Guangzhou, China, used health behavior questionnaire data from the UK Biobank study to assess associations between consumption of sweetened, artificially sweetened and unsweetened coffee with mortality all confounded and cause-specific.

More than 171,000 participants from the UK with no known heart disease or cancer answered several questions about eating and health behaviors to determine coffee drinking habits.

  • The authors found that over the 7-year follow-up period, participants who drank any amount of unsweetened coffee were 16-21% less likely to die than participants who drank no coffee.
  • They also found that participants who drank 1.5 to 3.5 cups of coffee sweetened with sugar per day were 29 to 31 percent less likely to die than participants who did not drink coffee.
  • The authors noted that adults who drank sugary coffee only added about 1 teaspoon of sugar per cup of coffee on average.
  • The results were inconclusive for participants who used artificial sweeteners in their coffee.

Any accompanying editorial by the editors of Annals of Internal Medicine notes that while coffee has qualities that could make possible health benefits, confounding variables, including harder-to-measure differences in socioeconomic status, diet, and other lifestyle factors , can have an impact on the results.

Previous studies looking at the health effects of coffee have shown that coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of death, but have not distinguished between unsweetened coffee and coffee consumed with sugar or artificial sweeteners. Image is in public domain

The authors add that the participants’ data is at least 10 years old and was collected in a country where tea is an equally popular beverage.

They warn that the average daily amount of sugar per cup of coffee recorded in this analysis is much lower than that of specialty drinks in popular coffee chain restaurants, and many coffee drinkers may drink it instead of others. drinks that make comparisons with non-drinkers more difficult. .

Based on this data, clinicians can tell their patients that it is not necessary for most coffee drinkers to eliminate the beverage from their diet, but to be wary of higher calorie specialty coffees.

About this coffee and mortality research news

Author: Press office
Source: American College of Physicians
Contact: Press Office – American College of Physicians
Image: Image is in public domain

Original research: Access closed.
“Association of sweetened, artificially sweetened, and unsweetened coffee consumption with all-cause and cause-specific mortality” by Dan Liu et al. Annals of Internal Medicine

Access closed.
“The Potential Health Benefits of Coffee: Does a Spoonful of Sugar Make Everything Go Away?” by Christina C. Wee. Annals of Internal Medicine


Summary

Association of sweetened, artificially sweetened, and unsweetened coffee consumption with all-cause and cause-specific mortality

Background:

Previous observational studies have suggested an association between coffee consumption and reduced risk of death, but these studies did not distinguish between coffee consumed with sugar or artificial sweeteners and coffee consumed without.

Objective:

To assess associations between consumption of sweetened, artificially sweetened, and unsweetened coffee with all-cause and cause-specific mortality.

Design:

Prospective cohort study.

Setting:

Data were extracted from the UK Biobank.

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A total of 171,616 participants (mean age, 55.6 years [SD, 7.9]) without cardiovascular disease (CVD) or cancer at baseline were eligible. Basic demographic, lifestyle and dietary data from the UK Biobank were used, with tracking starting in 2009 and ending in 2018.

Measurements:

Dietary consumption of sweetened, artificially sweetened, and unsweetened coffee was self-reported. All-cause, cancer-related, and cardiovascular-related mortality were estimated.

Results:

During a median follow-up of 7.0 years, 3177 deaths were recorded (including 1725 cancer deaths and 628 CVD deaths). Cox models with penalized splines showed U-shaped associations of unsweetened coffee, sweetened coffee, and artificially sweetened coffee with mortality. Compared to non-consumers, consumers of various amounts of unsweetened coffee (>0-1.5, >1.5-2.5, >2.5-3.5, >3.5-4.5 and > 4.5 drinks/d) had lower risks of all-cause mortality after adjusting for lifestyle, sociodemographic, and clinical factors, with respective hazard ratios of 0.79 (95% CI, 0 .70 to 0.90), 0.84 (CI, 0.74 to 0.95), 0.71 (CI, 0.62 to 0.82), 0.71 (CI, 0.60 to 0, 84), and 0.77 (CI, 0.65 to 0.91); respective estimates of sweetened coffee consumption were 0.91 (CI, 0.78 to 1.07), 0.69 (CI, 0.57 to 0.84), 0.72 (CI, 0.57 to 0.91), 0.79 (CI, 0.60 to 1.06) and 1.05 ( CI, 0.82 to 1.36). The association between artificially sweetened coffee and mortality was less consistent. The association of coffee consumption with cancer and cardiovascular disease mortality was largely consistent with that with all-cause mortality. U-shaped associations were also observed for instant, ground and decaffeinated coffee.

Limitation:

The exposure assessed at baseline may not capture changes in intake over time.

Conclusion:

Moderate consumption of unsweetened and sweetened coffee was associated with a lower risk of death.

Main funding source:

National Natural Science Foundation of China, Elite Young Scientists Sponsorship Program by CAST and project supported by Guangdong Basic and Applied Research Foundation.


Summary

The Potential Health Benefits of Coffee: Does a Spoonful of Sugar Make Everything Go Away?

Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages and there is a long-standing interest in understanding its health effects.

According to a 2022 estimate, Americans drink 517 million cups of coffee daily, and 66% of Americans surveyed said they drank coffee in the past day.

Much of the evidence to date on the health effects of coffee is based on observational studies, and these – including 2 previous studies published by Annals in 2017 by Gunter and colleagues and Park and colleagues – suggest a U-shaped relationship between coffee consumption and all-cause mortality. and other health outcomes; those who consume moderate amounts of coffee daily.


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