Hinckley granted full freedom 41 years after shooting Reagan | OMCP News


John Hinckley, the man who shot President Ronald Reagan in 1981, has been unconditionally and unrestrictedly released 41 years after the shooting that nearly killed Reagan.

At 11:22 a.m., BREAKING NEWS: John Hinckley, the man who shot President Ronald Reagan in 1981, has been unconditionally and unrestrictedly released 41 years after the shooting that nearly killed Reagan.

Hinckley was found not guilty by reason of insanity.

His unconditional release will take effect on June 15.

United States District Court Judge Paul L. Friedman said, “John Hinckley attempted to kill the President of the United States. He came very close to doing so. We learned that President Reagan was very close to death. James Brady was injured for life. Brady later died of his injuries.

“In 1981, over 40 years ago, John Hinckley was a deeply troubled young man. He suffered from acute psychosis. … He started stalking the president. The president was Jimmy Carter. He never got close to Jimmy Carter. But he got closer to Ronald Reagan.

Hinckley was confined to a mental hospital in Washington for more than two decades after a jury found him not guilty by reason of insanity.

He was eventually allowed to live in Williamsburg, with his mother and 34 conditions.

“He has been in complete and sustained remission for more than 25 years. He complied with all the conditions imposed by the court. He demonstrated self-awareness and responsibility for his mental illness. He’s been under a microscope like none of us have ever been,” the judge said.

“We don’t lose sight of what he did 40 years ago. He’s been vetted, he’s passed all the tests. I’m confident Mr Hinckley will do well in his remaining years. I hope the public will understand, he has made such progress and he is no longer a danger.

Prosecutors had no objection to Hickley’s release.

PREVIOUSLY at 11:18 a.m.:

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge is set to preside over an important hearing for John Hinckley, the man who shot President Ronald Reagan in 1981 and is set to be released from all remaining restrictive conditions.

U.S. District Court Judge Paul L. Friedman said in September that he would release Hinckley from the restrictions on June 15 as long as Hinckley continued to do well. Officials say Hinckley did, and Wednesday’s hearing, which Hinckley will not attend, should not alter those plans.

Hinckley was confined to a mental hospital in Washington for more than two decades after a jury found him not guilty due to the insanity of shooting Reagan. But beginning in 2003, Friedman began allowing Hinckley to live longer in the community with requirements such as undergoing therapy and restrictions on where he can travel. He has lived full-time in Virginia since 2016, although he is still subject to restrictions.

These include: allowing government officials access to his electronic devices, emails and online accounts; being banned from going to places where he knows there will be someone protected by the Secret Service, and being given three days’ notice if he wants to travel more than 120 miles from his home in Virginia.

In July, Hinckley – who plays guitar and sings and has shared his music on a YouTube channel – plans to perform a concert in Brooklyn, New York. Appearances in Connecticut and Chicago for what he called the “John Hinckley Redemption Tour” have been cancelled.

The judge said Hinckley, who turned 67 on Sunday, has shown no symptoms of active mental illness, no violent behavior and no interest in weapons since 1983.

In a status report filed ahead of Wednesday’s hearing, prosecutors wrote that health officials who have overseen Hinckley’s treatment for years believe he “has come to his senses such that he does not present of danger to himself or others due to mental illness if he is released unconditionally”. intended.

Prosecutors had previously opposed ending the restrictions, but changed their stance last year, saying they would agree to Hinckley’s release from the terms if he continued to show mental stability and abide by the restrictions . Prosecutor Kacie Weston wrote in a court filing ahead of the hearing that “the government has found no evidence to suggest that Mr. Hinckley’s absolute discharge should not be granted”, as the judge had previously ruled.

Reagan recovered from the March 30, 1981 shooting, but his publicist, James Brady, who died in 2014, was partially paralyzed. Secret Service Agent Timothy McCarthy and Washington Police Officer Thomas Delahanty were also injured. Reagan died in 2004.

In the 2000s, Hinckley began, with the judge’s approval, making visits to his parents’ home in Williamsburg, Virginia. His father died in 2008, but in 2016 he was allowed to live with his mother full time. Yet he was required to attend individual and group therapy sessions, was prohibited from speaking to the media, and could only move within a limited area. The Secret Service would also track him periodically.

Hinckley’s mother died in 2021. He has since moved out of her home. In recent years, Hinckley has made money selling items at an antique mall and selling books online.

Hinckley said on his YouTube channel that he started a record label, Emporia Records, and his first release would be a 14-song CD of his music. He also promotes his music on Twitter.

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