2 dead, 4 hospitalized as Bronx Legionnaire cases rise to 24


City health officials reported Wednesday that two people have died and four are currently hospitalized following an outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease in a Bronx neighborhood.

The two people who died in the Highbridge community were over 50 and “had risk factors for serious illness”, the city’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said.

Within a week, confirmed cases in the neighborhood jumped to 24 — health officials only confirmed 10 cases on May 24.

The initial outbreak began as early as May 3, according to a department report.

The Department of Health last week launched a remediation process for four cooling towers in Highbridge which tested positive for the presence of Legionella pneumophila, a bacteria which can cause a serious lung infection known as lung disease. legionnaire.

A New York water cooling tower that showed traces of Legionella pneumophila bacteria in 2015.
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Confirmed cases in the neighborhood have risen to 24 this week.
Confirmed cases in the neighborhood have risen to 24 this week.
Brigitte Stelzer

Asked if officials plan to handle the latest surge in cases, department representative Michael Lanza told the Post, “All 24 cases of the disease had onset dates prior to [treatment of the cooling towers].”

Legionnaires’ disease is a type of pneumonia that develops in hot water and generally resembles other types of pneumonia. The disease can be caused by plumbing systems such as cooling towers, hot tubs, hot tubs, humidifiers, hot water tanks and evaporative condensers of large air conditioning systems, according to the report. .

Legionnaires' disease is a type of pneumonia that thrives in hot water.
Legionnaires’ disease is a type of pneumonia that thrives in hot water.
NYC Health
City health officials have warned area residents to be aware of flu-like symptoms and other signs of illness.
City health officials have warned area residents to be aware of flu-like symptoms and other signs of illness.
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People most at risk of getting Legionnaires’ disease are people aged 50 and over, cigarette smokers, and people with chronic lung disease or weakened immune systems.

City health officials are urging anyone in the affected area with flu-like symptoms, fever, cough or difficulty breathing to seek immediate medical attention.


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